Can dry shampoo cause hair loss?

21/09/2015

Young woman looking at her hair isolated over white

Unfortunately the answer to that question appears to be yes. It can not only cause hair loss but it can also leave your scalp sore and irritated and trigger dandruff. Dry shampoo can be great if it is used in the right way but specialists feel it should be used with care and moderation in order to get its true benefits. Users seeing the symptoms stated above often do not link the problem with the shampoo they are using – so let’s take a closer look.

Using dry shamppo for the quick wash and go

Dry shampoo surprisingly has been around for some time. It was originally used in Victorian times when arrowroot was sprinkled on the hair to absorb the grease and create that look that modern users are looking for now: an extra bounce while looking clean, silky and smooth. The main attraction of dry shampoo is it can be applied in an instant and in the pressurised 21st century its presence for many rushing from work to a social life it is almost essential.

Hair stylists give their verdicts

Many high profile hairdressers have given their verdicts. Lee Stafford (whose clients include Billie Piper and model Agyness Deyn) agrees it is very effective but says that it was never designed to be used on a regular basis. Iain Sallis, a trichologist at the Farjo Hair Institute in Manchester commented to the Mail Online that its name was actually a misnomer as it wasn’t a shampoo at all. It works by depositing a talc on the scalp which absorbs the oil.

He said “It coats the hair rather than making it clean, which means that the microbes which feed on the moisture in the scalp will still be there. For people prone to dandruff or dermatitis, the scalp will become flaky to get rid of the irritation. And by its nature, it’s a gritty product, which will cause friction on the skin. That can make the scalp sore over time, especially if it’s not washed out.”

Moderating use

Ian recommends that dry shampoo is used just once a week when in a rush – but no more than that. It is really about thinking of it as a styling tool rather than a quick easy way to wash your hair – which it isn’t. By just using dry shampoo instead of washing your hair regularly you are actually adding extra foreign bodies to the skalp and hair. If these are not washed away properly it is obvious they are going to cause irritation and damage.

Hair loss which is a result of using dry shampoo too much often occurs because it triggers a greater fall of hair in the shedding cycle. Any hair loss is reversible once you start moderating how you use dry shampoos – and giving your hair some real attention and respect in the long run may well be a real good thing.

Scalp™ Micro Pigmentation cares for you and your hair. To find out more about Micro Pigmentation click here[:it]Unfortunately the answer to that question appears to be yes. It can not only cause hair loss but it can also leave your scalp sore and irritated and trigger dandruff. Dry shampoo can be great if it is used in the right way but specialists feel it should be used with care and moderation in order to get its true benefits. Users seeing the symptoms stated above often do not link the problem with the shampoo they are using – so let’s take a closer look.

Using dry shamppo for the quick wash and go

Dry shampoo surprisingly has been around for some time. It was originally used in Victorian times when arrowroot was sprinkled on the hair to absorb the grease and create that look that modern users are looking for now: an extra bounce while looking clean, silky and smooth. The main attraction of dry shampoo is it can be applied in an instant and in the pressurised 21st century its presence for many rushing from work to a social life it is almost essential.

Hair stylists give their verdicts

Many high profile hairdressers have given their verdicts. Lee Stafford (whose clients include Billie Piper and model Agyness Deyn) agrees it is very effective but says that it was never designed to be used on a regular basis. Iain Sallis, a trichologist at the Farjo Hair Institute in Manchester commented to the Mail Online that its name was actually a misnomer as it wasn’t a shampoo at all. It works by depositing a talc on the scalp which absorbs the oil.

He said “It coats the hair rather than making it clean, which means that the microbes which feed on the moisture in the scalp will still be there. For people prone to dandruff or dermatitis, the scalp will become flaky to get rid of the irritation. And by its nature, it’s a gritty product, which will cause friction on the skin. That can make the scalp sore over time, especially if it’s not washed out.”

Moderating use

Ian recommends that dry shampoo is used just once a week when in a rush – but no more than that. It is really about thinking of it as a styling tool rather than a quick easy way to wash your hair – which it isn’t. By just using dry shampoo instead of washing your hair regularly you are actually adding extra foreign bodies to the skalp and hair. If these are not washed away properly it is obvious they are going to cause irritation and damage.

Hair loss which is a result of using dry shampoo too much often occurs because it triggers a greater fall of hair in the shedding cycle. Any hair loss is reversible once you start moderating how you use dry shampoos – and giving your hair some real attention and respect in the long run may well be a real good thing.

Scalp™ Micro Pigmentation cares for you and your hair. To find out more about Micro Pigmentation click here

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