Hair loss in teenage years

18/09/2015

The idea that it is only middle-aged men who lose their hair is quite a powerful myth in Western society. It has taken hold to such an extent that when younger men lose their hair they are immediately burdened with a cultural attitude that “they look older than their years”. Well, to a certain extent it is understandable – if the majority of men with hair loss expected to be in middle-age then the comparison is highly likely. But the fact is hair loss is in no way confined to men in their autumn years. It can strike at almost any age and for younger teenage boys it can be quite a disturbing complaint.

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Embarrassed with physical appearance and a damaged self-esteem

It is sometimes seen as inevitable for a man to lose his hair in his forties and fifties and so is often almost accepted in a complacent manner. On the other hand, the younger guy has a lot to contend with. Just when he is keeping up with the trends of the times, he is looking in the mirror and scarily seeing his father. Because hair loss for the teenage boy is not seen as acceptable he may become embarrassed with his physical appearance.

For any young guy trying to make out this is quite a handicap. As much as teenage boys want to look older than their years, they do not want it to be percieved in a negative way. Hence, it is likely their confidence and self-esteem will take quite a knock and subsequently they may start to withdraw from normal social peer activities just when their world and horizons should be expanding.

Hair loss is often taken very lightly – it is seen as a complaint which is non-life threatening and something “most guys have to put up with”. But because it is rarely talked about openly in social circles, that anxiety and feelings of anger often go unheard.

Reasons for hair loss in teenagers

There are many reasons why hair loss may occur for younger men. Androgenetic Alopecia (also known as male pattern baldness) can begin at any age – even as early as the teens. This type of hair loss which shows itself in losing hair from the crown and the front hairline is common and is usually triggered by genetics. Because of this, you cannot really halt it in its tracks but there are many ways to mask the effects. (hair transplants, medication, Micro Pigmentation).

Alopecia Areata can shows itself as round or oval patches of bald skin. It is believed it is triggered when the immune system for some reason attacks the hair follicles. It is known to be temporary and your GP can offer advice and medication. Ringworm, a fungal infection, can also cause hair loss but is also treatable with medication. Side effects of other conditions such as lupus or thyroid disease may cause hair loss.

Your lifestyle may be having an effect on hair loss. Just like all parts of your body, your hair and scalp needs the right nutrition, vitamins and minerals to thrive. Eating the right stuff probably isn’t your first priority at 18 but it is worth taking into account. Those late teenage years can be quite stressful as you become an adult and stress can cause hair loss. So be honest with yourself – if your struggling, talk to someone or get help – it may be affecting you in more ways than you realise.

How you wear your hair is important. Some of the new trendy styles could be putting too much pressure on your hair and hair follicles. (dreadlocks, dyes, corncrows etc.)

Moving forward

There are things you can do if you feel concerned you are losing your hair too early. It may be a case of visiting your GP for advice and getting meds, it could mean a re-balance of your lifestyle. It could mean you give your hair a bit of relief from your beautiful dreadlocks. Whatever – never feel you are alone and remember – it is quite normal.

At Skalp™ micro Pigmentation we care about you and we care about your hair. To learn mo0re about Micro Pigmentation click here[:it]The idea that it is only middle-aged men who lose their hair is quite a powerful myth in Western society. It has taken hold to such an extent that when younger men lose their hair they are immediately burdened with a cultural attitude that “they look older than their years”. Well, to a certain extent it is understandable – if the majority of men with hair loss expected to be in middle-age then the comparison is highly likely. But the fact is hair loss is in no way confined to men in their autumn years. It can strike at almost any age and for younger teenage boys it can be quite a disturbing complaint.

Embarrassed with physical appearance and a damaged self-esteem

It is sometimes seen as inevitable for a man to lose his hair in his forties and fifties and so is often almost accepted in a complacent manner. On the other hand, the younger guy has a lot to contend with. Just when he is keeping up with the trends of the times, he is looking in the mirror and scarily seeing his father. Because hair loss for the teenage boy is not seen as acceptable he may become embarrassed with his physical appearance.

For any young guy trying to make out this is quite a handicap. As much as teenage boys want to look older than their years, they do not want it to be percieved in a negative way. Hence, it is likely their confidence and self-esteem will take quite a knock and subsequently they may start to withdraw from normal social peer activities just when their world and horizons should be expanding.

Hair loss is often taken very lightly – it is seen as a complaint which is non-life threatening and something “most guys have to put up with”. But because it is rarely talked about openly in social circles, that anxiety and feelings of anger often go unheard.

Reasons for hair loss in teenagers

There are many reasons why hair loss may occur for younger men. Androgenetic Alopecia (also known as male pattern baldness) can begin at any age – even as early as the teens. This type of hair loss which shows itself in losing hair from the crown and the front hairline is common and is usually triggered by genetics. Because of this, you cannot really halt it in its tracks but there are many ways to mask the effects. (hair transplants, medication, Micro Pigmentation).

Alopecia Areata can shows itself as round or oval patches of bald skin. It is believed it is triggered when the immune system for some reason attacks the hair follicles. It is known to be temporary and your GP can offer advice and medication. Ringworm, a fungal infection, can also cause hair loss but is also treatable with medication. Side effects of other conditions such as lupus or thyroid disease may cause hair loss.

Your lifestyle may be having an effect on hair loss. Just like all parts of your body, your hair and scalp needs the right nutrition, vitamins and minerals to thrive. Eating the right stuff probably isn’t your first priority at 18 but it is worth taking into account. Those late teenage years can be quite stressful as you become an adult and stress can cause hair loss. So be honest with yourself – if your struggling, talk to someone or get help – it may be affecting you in more ways than you realise.

How you wear your hair is important. Some of the new trendy styles could be putting too much pressure on your hair and hair follicles. (dreadlocks, dyes, corncrows etc.)

Moving forward

There are things you can do if you feel concerned you are losing your hair too early. It may be a case of visiting your GP for advice and getting meds, it could mean a re-balance of your lifestyle. It could mean you give your hair a bit of relief from your beautiful dreadlocks. Whatever – never feel you are alone and remember – it is quite normal.

 

At Skalp™ micro Pigmentation we care about you and we care about your hair. To learn mo0re about Micro Pigmentation click here

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