The truth about thyroid disease and hair loss

15/09/2015

Human Thyroid GlandIt is true to say that we all naturally lose hair all the time. Our hair goes through cycles where there are small periods of hair growth followed by periods of rapid hair growth. It is when that loss is continuous and the loss of hair is not replaced that you know you have a problem. Because it is so prolific in men, many guys jump to the conclusion that it is male pattern baldness. In other words it is hereditary and there is not a lot you can do about it. This is not true.

Many reasons for hair loss

First of all hair loss is apparent in both genders. Secondly, there could be a myriad of reasons why hair loss is occurring. Apart from their being many significant hair loss conditions (alopecia; trichotillomania etc.) it can be provoked by lifestyle (stress and bad diet can be an issue), how you actually wear your hair (where stress is placed on the hair follicles as in dreadlocks) and as a side effect of medications for other illnesses.

Signs of hair loss with thyroid disease

It can also be a side effect of other conditions you may be suffering from. Severe and prolonged hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can cause hair loss. Rather than appearing in patches it is likely to be seen across the whole of the scalp. The good news is whereas your hair will look sparse during the peak of its illness, your hair will regrow once treatment for the disorder has taken hold.

First signs

The point about this condition is it is not always diagnosed straight away. Patients have reported in some cases that it has been months or years before it is officially diagnosed. Whereas hair loss is unlikely if you have a mild form of the disease the hair loss itself may be one of the factors that alerts you to its presence.

Autoimmune disease

A condition closely linked with thyroid disease is autoimmune disease. Many sufferers find they have this as well as thyroid disease alone. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition that causes hair loss that occurs in people with autoimmune thyroid disease more often than expected by chance. Unlike the types of diffuse hair loss described above, alopecia areata causes discrete, often circular, areas of hair loss.

Future prognosis

Overall the prognosis with both these conditions is good as hair loss is likely to be temporary once the condition itself is controlled. But in all cases make sure that the hair loss is attributable to the condition itself – only that way can you gain the proper treatment. Take care how you look after your hair. Take care in washing, treating and grooming your hair. Be wary of home use products, and use recommended professional products for dye, highlights and conditioning. Use wide toothed brushes or combs

 

At Skalp™ Micro Pigmentation we care about you and care about your hair. To find out more about Micro Pigmentation click here[:it]It is true to say that we all naturally lose hair all the time. Our hair goes through cycles where there are small periods of hair growth followed by periods of rapid hair growth. It is when that loss is continuous and the loss of hair is not replaced that you know you have a problem. Because it is so prolific in men, many guys jump to the conclusion that it is male pattern baldness. In other words it is hereditary and there is not a lot you can do about it. This is not true.

Many reasons for hair loss

First of all hair loss is apparent in both genders. Secondly, there could be a myriad of reasons why hair loss is occurring. Apart from their being many significant hair loss conditions (alopecia; trichotillomania etc.) it can be provoked by lifestyle (stress and bad diet can be an issue), how you actually wear your hair (where stress is placed on the hair follicles as in dreadlocks) and as a side effect of medications for other illnesses.

Signs of hair loss with thyroid disease

It can also be a side effect of other conditions you may be suffering from. Severe and prolonged hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can cause hair loss. Rather than appearing in patches it is likely to be seen across the whole of the scalp. The good news is whereas your hair will look sparse during the peak of its illness, your hair will regrow once treatment for the disorder has taken hold.

First signs

The point about this condition is it is not always diagnosed straight away. Patients have reported in some cases that it has been months or years before it is officially diagnosed. Whereas hair loss is unlikely if you have a mild form of the disease the hair loss itself may be one of the factors that alerts you to its presence.

Autoimmune disease

A condition closely linked with thyroid disease is autoimmune disease. Many sufferers find they have this as well as thyroid disease alone. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition that causes hair loss that occurs in people with autoimmune thyroid disease more often than expected by chance. Unlike the types of diffuse hair loss described above, alopecia areata causes discrete, often circular, areas of hair loss.

Future prognosis 

Overall the prognosis with both these conditions is good as hair loss is likely to be temporary once the condition itself is controlled. But in all cases make sure that the hair loss is attributable to the condition itself – only that way can you gain the proper treatment. Take care how you look after your hair. Take care in washing, treating and grooming your hair. Be wary of home use products, and use recommended professional products for dye, highlights and conditioning. Use wide toothed brushes or combs

At Skalp™ Micro Pigmentation we care about you and care about your hair. To find out more about Micro Pigmentation click here

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